Courage is Courage

He is risen! He is risen indeed, alleluia!

It feels great to say “Alleluia” again, especially after giving it up for the lengthy nine weeks of pre-Lent (Gesima Sundays) and Lent. There are other things I’d much rather give up. Like snow… which it appears just missed us here in Michigan. You know, there are folks who revel in regularly bringing charges against the state of Michigan, most notably pointing to our roads, taxes, and other such things. For the most part, I love Michigan. But if I were to level a charge, it would be against the trickster months of April and May. These two months in Michigan are more than capable of snow.

Personally, after five months of snow, I’ve had enough.

“Well, you chose to live here, Chris.”

Actually, no, I didn’t choose to live here. I was sent here on an internship out of college. I chose to stay here, and it had nothing to do with the weather and everything to do with the woman who would eventually be my wife… which I try to bring to her remembrance with regularity. As often as I can, I remind her that I so courageously suffer the dreadfully gloomy Michigan winters for her sake.

Humor aside… and speaking of courage… what happened to it? To courage, that is.

I was a guest speaker at the MiCPAC conference this past Saturday, and after my speech, I had a conversation in the back of the auditorium with a person who expressed a gladness for the presenters being willing to speak out on some crucial issues facing our nation. I encouraged my conversation partner to do the same as she went about her daily routines. And her response: “I’m not brave enough to do what you guys are doing.”

“Unfortunately, we have no other choice, now,” was the essence of my reply. What I wanted to say more precisely, but didn’t, was that it isn’t necessarily a courageous thing to fight when fighting is your only choice. On the battlefield, when a soldier is found in the situation of “kill or be killed,” the choice to fight isn’t necessarily stirred by courage. It’s stirred by the need for survival. We’re getting very close to that these days. As people remain unwilling to step up and speak out, hoping to stay off of the enemy’s radar, more and more among us are finding themselves cornered.

I think it’s sort of disingenuous how so many in our own ranks will deal with those who show forth a level of discerning courage. Aristotle described it well when he said something like, “The coward calls the brave man rash, and the rash man calls him a coward.” In other words, far too many people will criticize the courageous among us while finding reasons to escape the need to be brave in the same circumstances. Whether it’s as simple as admitting to one’s own failings in a relationship in order to preserve its integrity or as seemingly grand as needing to take a stand for the sake of the Gospel before the princes of this world, in the end, they’ll bow out when they’re needed most.

But true courage is borne out not just when it’s needed, but even as it first sees the need coming. And in the end, faithfulness is faithfulness no matter how pressing the situation might eventually become. It’s what a courageous one is and does both when no one else is watching and when the TV cameras are taking aim for a whole world of criticizing voices.

Among Christians, there’s a reason for us to claim such courage. Our courage isn’t human courage. It’s otherworldly courage.

One of my favorite Bible verses is Psalm 27:1, which is a rhetorical rendition of divinely inspired courage expressed by King David.

“The LORD is my light and my salvation. Whom shall I fear? The LORD is the stronghold of my life; of whom shall I be afraid?”

Couple King David’s words with the fact that the same Lord to whom he is referring—the One who would be born of a virgin, born under the Law, born to suffer Death in David’s place that he would receive the merits of His victory over Sin, Death, and the power of the devil—joined to that Gospel, we already call out, “He is risen, indeed! Alleluia!” Those aren’t empty words. They are words of courage. They are words that herald to every single terrifying noun in this life—every person, place, thing, and idea—that we are no longer bound by the rules of their game for survival. We have recreated innards that can act before acting is even required. We can know and confess our sinful selves before the accusations come. We can go to church to be fed by the Gospel of our Lord’s love before we find ourselves in a situation where we feel like it’s our only option for peace. We can speak boldly in the world around us without needing to be prompted.

And why? Well, I like the way G.K. Chesterton said it:

“Courage is almost a contradiction in terms. It means a strong desire to live taking the form of a readiness to die.”

He wrote those words understanding that in Christ we’ve already died to this world and have now been made alive (Romans 6:11). Knowing this, not even Death’s stare is so terrifying that we need to cower. Faith has its eyes fixed to the resurrection of Jesus. His resurrection is our resurrection. And if that’s true—if not even Death can level itself against us—then what do we have to fear when it comes to the darker situations this world sends our way? Not much.

Be courageous. Be faithful. Steer right into the challenges you face in your families, in your vocations, in this world. No matter what happens, by the power of the Holy Spirit, trust that the Lord is your light and salvation. You have nothing to fear. With such a knowledge in one’s guts, it’s pretty amazing how the clouds of fearful concern will dissipate from any situation stirring dread.

And trust me, like so many of you, I can say what I’ve said because I’ve experienced it myself.